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Out-of-State Traffic Ticket Convictions Will Appear on Your Missouri Driving Record

Convictions for traffic tickets received when traveling outside of your home state of Missouri will appear on your Missouri driving record. Missouri treats traffic ticket convictions that you receive in most other states the same as if those violations had occurred in Missouri, and points will be added to your Missouri driving record for those out-of-state convictions.

Most States Report Traffic Ticket Convictions to the Driver’s Home State

Most states report convictions for speeding tickets and other traffic violations to a driver’s home state because of the Driver License Compact, which requires the states that are members of the Compact to report all license suspensions and convictions for traffic violations and DWI/DUI to the driver’s home state. The Driver License Compact is an agreement among the states to share driver information and convictions for the purpose of promoting highway safety.

Only Two States Do Not Report Convictions to the Driver’s Home State

The states that do not participate in the Driver License Compact are Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. However, Georgia, Massachusetts and Tennessee are members of the Non-Resident Violator Compact and will report to your home state any conviction information related to your activities in their state.

The two states that are not members of the Compact (Michigan and Wisconsin) do not report convictions to your home state, but they do keep track of any speeding tickets or other traffic violations you incur in their state and may suspend your driving privileges in their state if you accumulate too many violations there.

New York Does Not Add Points To a Driver’s New York Driving Record For Out-Of-State Traffic Tickets

Another exception is New York. If a New York driver receives an out-of-state traffic ticket, New York will not add points to that person’s New York driving record, provided the ticket is not alcohol- or drug-related. However, insurance agents will be able to see the New York driver’s traffic violation that he obtained in another state and they can raise his insurance rates because of it.

New York reports drivers’ traffic violations to New Jersey, but New Jersey only records a maximum of 2 points on the driver’s New Jersey driving record, no matter how many points New York assessed for the traffic violation.

For more information, see my blog post about Missouri drivers with New York speeding tickets.

States May Disagree About Whether a Speeding Ticket is a Point Violation

In some situations, a speeding ticket outside of Missouri may not be considered a point violation by the other state but it may still be a point violation in Missouri.

If you get a speeding ticket in a state other than your home state of Missouri and you decide to not have the ticket “fixed” (meaning, you decide to not hire an attorney in that other state to negotiate a plea bargain with the court to have the ticket amended to a non-moving, no-point infraction) because the traffic violation was not a point violation in that state, then you should be aware that the conviction will be reported to Missouri and points will be added to your driving record if Missouri considers it a point violation.

In other words, you could end up with points added to your Missouri driving record for a speeding ticket or other traffic violation you received in a state where it was not considered a point violation.

Deciphering the Convictions Reported on Your Missouri Driving Record

Each traffic violation has its own code, called an ACD code. For example, a conviction in Kansas for a traffic violation called “inattentive driving” shares the same code as the traffic violation that Missouri calls “careless and imprudent driving.” So, if you are convicted in Kansas of “inattentive driving,” Kansas will report it to your home state of Missouri and it will be recorded on your driving record as “careless and imprudent driving.”

You can contact the court that issued the speeding ticket to find out how the ticket is being coded. Then you can contact the Missouri Department of Revenue or a traffic law attorney licensed in Missouri to determine how a moving violation conviction with that particular code will be treated in your home state of Missouri and how it could affect your driving record.

Consult an Attorney in the State Where You Received the Speeding Ticket

If you are a Missouri driver and you receive a speeding ticket or citation for a traffic violation in a state other than your home state of Missouri, you should consult an attorney in the state where you received the speeding ticket to find out if it is considered a point violation in that state. Then contact the Missouri Department of Revenue or a traffic law attorney licensed in Missouri to find out if the same violation, when reported to Missouri, will cause points to be added to your Missouri driving record.

If the out-of-state ticket is considered a point violation in that other state, you may want to hire an attorney in that state to negotiate a plea bargain with the court to have the ticket amended to a non-moving, no-point violation so that it is not reported to Missouri and no points are added to your driving record.

Only Convictions for Moving Violations Appear on Missouri Driving Record

Only convictions for moving violations are reported and appear on your Missouri driving record. If you receive a speeding ticket in a state other than your home state of Missouri and you get it amended to a non-moving violation, then nothing will be reported to Missouri and no points will be added to your Missouri driving record.

Your Missouri Driver’s License Will be Suspended or Revoked if You Accumulate Too Many Points

Remember that your driver’s license will be suspended if you accumulate too many points on your Missouri driving record within a certain period of time. If you accumulate 8 points within 18 months, your driver’s license will be suspended for 30 days, if it’s a first-time suspension. If it’s your second offense, then your license will be suspended for 60 days, and for a third offense, your driving privileges will be suspended for 90 days.

Your driving privileges will be revoked for 1 year if you accumulate 12 points on your Missouri driving record within 12 months, 18 points within 24 months, or 24 points within 36 months.

How to Find Out How Many Points Are on Your Missouri Driving Record

To find out how many points you currently have on your driving record, call:
The Missouri Department of Revenue
Jefferson City, MO
(573) 526-2407 ext. 2

To learn more about Missouri traffic law, go to our traffic law resources page for links to information regarding Missouri speeding tickets, points, Missouri driver’s licenses, courts, and other traffic-related issues.

 

 

 

 

11 Comments

  1. Mindy on September 29, 2013 at 4:58 pm

    Hi, could you answer the following?:

    If a person has just moved to Missouri and still is driving with their Texas driver’s license when they receive a speeding ticket, but they get a new Missouri Driver’s license that week, will the points for that ticket attached to the Texas license follow to their Missouri license? (there were no points or violations on the Texas license prior to recent speeding ticket.)
    The reason for the question concerns whether it makes more sense to simply pay the ticket outright which costs less money or to pay a lawyer and a higher fine for an adjusted charge. Obviously, if the points don’t move from the TX DL number to the MO DL #, it would make sense to simply pay the fine.

    Thanks for any help you can provide, M

    • Andrea Storey Rogers on September 30, 2013 at 5:51 am

      Yes, if you have a Texas license and get a speeding ticket in Missouri, the Missouri speeding ticket will be reported to Texas, then Texas will add that speeding conviction to your Texas driving record. When you obtain a Missouri license, Missouri will be able to see your Texas driving record. All states share information about traffic tickets and other criminal offenses, and they check your driving record in your home state before issuing you a driver’s license in the new state. Otherwise, it would be an unfair advantage to people who are just moving to a new state. If you want to confirm this, call the Missouri Dept. of Revenue at (573) 751-4475 (the driver’s license bureau).

  2. Mindy on October 1, 2013 at 9:28 am

    Thanks for your reply. I guess my question is that when I applied for my Missouri license, the ticket would not have yet shown up on my TX license since it hasn’t been 30 days since the ticket. Will Missouri be continuing to receive reports from Texas regarding my old license and the ticket that would likely appear on it in a few weeks?

    Either way, I plan to pay the fine. Again, I’m just trying to determine whether it is worth the extra money to address the points.
    thanks, mindy

  3. Jake on February 7, 2015 at 8:59 am

    I hope you will answer this question as I have spent many hours on the phone trying the find the answer…
    I am visiting friends down in Florida… I live in missour and have a Missouri driver license …I had a little fender bender and received a ticket… I was informed about going to driving school since I received the ticket… Tho where do I go to driving school in Missouri or do I go in Florida… I don’t want points on my license… I never had a accident or got a ticket before either …
    Thanks so much for helping…..jake

    • Andrea Storey Rogers on February 7, 2015 at 9:17 am

      If you received a traffic ticket in Florida, you need to consult a traffic law attorney who is licensed in Florida. If Florida offers the option of attending driving school, I would imagine you would have to attend it in Florida, or if it’s an online class, you would have to take a Florida-approved online class. Your best option is to consult the Florida Dept. of Motor Vehicles and also consult an experienced traffic law attorney licensed in Florida.

  4. Jake on February 13, 2015 at 9:38 am

    Will the state of Missouri put points on my license for a out of state citation…thanks for helping me figure this out…

    • Andrea Storey Rogers on February 13, 2015 at 10:21 am

      Yes. If you receive an out-of-state traffic ticket and you don’t hire an attorney to get that ticket amended to a non-moving, no-point violation, the conviction will be reported back to your home state. If your home state is Missouri, then Missouri will add that traffic violation conviction to your Missouri driving record. Missouri will add the appropriate number of points on to your driving record based on the nature of the violation. So, for example, if it was a state violation (ticket was issued by a state trooper), then Missouri will add 3 points to your driving record. If the out-of-state ticket was for driving without insurance, Missouri will add 4 points to your driving record. And if it was just a standard speeding ticket issued by a municipality (issued by a city cop), then Missouri will add 2 points to your driving record. If you want to get your out-of-state ticket amended to a non-moving, no-point violation, you will need to hire a traffic law attorney who is licensed in the state where you received the ticket.

  5. Jeff Thompson on May 2, 2016 at 11:22 pm

    My 18 year old got her first ticket while driving in Iowa. I contacted an attorney in Iowa and he said they don’t ammend tickets to non moving violation. The trooper actually reduded the speed with a notation on the ticket which the lawer said was a huge favor since it dropped it beneath 20mph over. So reading your blog, she will get a few points on her missouri license, but I don’t see any alternative for fixing Iowa tickets, as confirmed by an actual Iowa attorney. Do you believe this is the correct interpretation regarding the state of Iowa?
    Thanks!

    • Andrea Storey Rogers on May 4, 2016 at 3:35 pm

      I am licensed to practice law in Missouri, not Iowa. For this question, you need to consult a traffic law attorney who is licensed to practice law in Iowa.

  6. […] on your Missouri driving record, just the same as if you received that ticket in Missouri. See my previous blog post about why out-of-state traffic ticket convictions appear on your driving record in your home state […]

  7. Andrea Storey Rogers on November 2, 2016 at 8:49 pm

    If your license is revoked in 1 state, it’s revoked in all states. Kansas will not give you a driver’s license if your license is revoked in Massachusetts. You need to clear up your problems in Massachusetts and get your license reinstated there before you can get a license in Kansas.

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